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B 374 Social Innovation Week 1

This is going to be a very interesting class. It is very different from the Introduction to Entrepreneurship class I just took. The Intro to Entrepreneurship class seemed to allow for a bit more creativity in the lessons than what it looks like this class will allow. This class looks like it’s going to be a lot more specific on what each assignment must look like including the journal entries.

This week I studied the class syllabus and became familiar with the weekly due dates and class patterns. I also started to learn more about social innovation and social entrepreneurship. After reading a couple of papers on these topics and watching a few short videos I believe social innovation is to advance society as a whole through means of new or improved products and services. I consider myself an entrepreneur and am pursuing a Business Management degree with an emphasis in Entrepreneurship. I hope to be a social entrepreneur, but believe anyone can be a social innovator. Anyone can be a social innovator and cross the borders between government, business, and non-profit world to be a gamechanger that improves society for everyone as a whole.

In the paper, Rediscovering Social Innovation, I read about Muhammad Yunus, the innovator behind microlending. He saw a need and created Grameen Bank to provide microloans to people that did not qualify for standard loans due to lack of credit history or being very low income. He became a social entrepreneur through means of social innovation. He was a professor that started an experiment of lending money to very low-income people in a nearby village. He tried to get local banks to back the loans, but they refused. His goal was not the financial rewards of being a bank or being an entrepreneur, but he wanted social change. He believed everyone deserved credit. In a similar fashion, I want to identify a social need and innovate a solution.

Social innovation is more prevalent today than ever before. As high-tech companies launch social innovation agendas, it inspires ordinary people to get involved as well. As individuals get involved they begin to care more deeply about the needs of their local community. During this service, they begin to identify root causes and try to develop innovative solutions to help. People use their Social Media accounts to document their service and help inspire others to do the same. Anyone can check their Facebook or Instagram accounts and see posts by friends, family, or business regarding their work on social issues.

Here are links to readings and videos of the week:

What Is Social Innovation?

The Ballard Center – Social Innovation Lives Here

The Meaning of “Social Entrepreneurship” – Dees

SSIR Rediscovering Social Innovation – Phils, Deiglmeier, Miller

 

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B 183 ENTREPRENEURIAL JOURNAL – Last Lecture

If you had one final lecture to share with a group of students on what you have learned from this course, what would you share? What would be your last bit of advice to someone wanting to begin the entrepreneur journey? What words of advice, direction, or caution would you give him or her if you had only one chance to give your own last lecture? Write your last lecture about your experiences and answer the above stated questions.

 

It has been an incredible semester. I loved taking the Introduction to Entrepreneurship class during a summer semester because it required me to spend a lot of time working on it every week. Spending so much time on it helped it be a daily priority and keep the topics and lessons learned at the forefront of my thinking. Here is a list of highlights from the class:

Lesson 1: Living life as an entrepreneurial hero.

  1. Dream big.
    1. “All heroes have a worthy object for their quest.
  2. All epic journeys and all paths to mastery begin with a step—so will yours.
    1. “No matter what compels you, you must pass through that narrow gate, that first step that signifies that there is no turning back.”
  3. Accept that life is hard and seldom fair.
    1. “Having the courage to pick yourself up after you’ve been knocked to the ground is what makes life worth living.”
  4. Persevere from difficult decisions to habits to character to destiny.
    1. “Entrepreneurial heroes forge themselves one hard decision at a time, never giving up, always moving forward.”
  5. You get to choose, but you are not in control. Real entrepreneurs learn to fail quickly, cheaply, often.
    1. “You cannot control the uncontrollable. And that means you will sometimes fail. The sooner you embrace failure as a friend, the better.
  6. Choose your fellow travelers.
    1. “Choosing your fellow travelers may not seem as exciting as slaying the dragons of competition, but it may well be the most important decision an entrepreneurial hero will make.”

Lesson 2: Listen to your heart.

“When we urgently and unhesitatingly act on the promptings of our hearts, we demonstrate our faith that what we’re doing is in line with God’s will for our lives. Our faithful and urgent action then allows God to have a greater hand in these actions.” The Ministry of Business

 

Lesson 3: Jim Ritchie’s Formula for Success.

  1. Get up early.
    1. Every successful person Jim Ritchie knows is an early riser. Get a head start on your competition.
  2. Work hard.
  3. Get your education.
    1. Use your education and training to be good at something, maybe even great at something, maybe even the best at something. You need to outproduce your competition and be terrific at something. Education is the key to the door of opportunity.
  4. Find oil.
    1. Use your education and training to be good at something, maybe even great at something, maybe even the best at something. You need to outproduce your competition and be terrific at something.
  5. Make your mark.
    1. Use your education and training to be good at something, maybe even great at something, maybe even the best at something. You need to outproduce your competition and be terrific at something.
  6. Prepare to server/give back.

 

Lesson 4: “3 Principles for Success” and Deconstructing Fears.

  1. The Tri-Quation
    1. In the Tri-Quation, the roles of productivity, self-esteem, and event control play equal parts that must be in balance. Think of a three-legged stool. If one of the legs are missing or too short, the stool cannot stand.
  2. The Productivity Pyramid
    1. In the Productivity Pyramid, we determine our governing values that we want to live our life by. We then create long-term goals, short-term goals, and daily tasks to help us become the people we want to be.
  3. A Personal Constitution
    1. The third principle of for success is the Personal Constitution. This is a guiding document where we take our governing values, write out what they mean to you, and then prioritize the values. For example, if you value integrity and financial independence you may want to have integrity above financial independence on your Personal Constitution. Otherwise, if you face a situation where if you lie about something you may get some financial gain you will put your integrity at risk.

Deconstruct your fears by creating a spreadsheet with one column listing fears, in a second column write down a strategy to mitigate risk for that fear, and in a third column write down how you would recover back to the “Status Quo” if that fear came to pass.

 

Lesson 5: Learn to live life with meaning.

  1. Did I contribute to something meaningful?
  2. Was I a good person?
  3. Who did I love? Who loved me?

“Entrepreneurs become successful, one small investment at a time, in a never-ending process. Because entrepreneurial success isn’t a destination, it’s a journey. A journey taken one determined step at a time, in a way that builds lifelong treasures.” – Jeff Sandefer

 

Lesson 6: So you want to be an entrepreneur?

  1. Areas of knowledge needed:
    1. In-depth knowledge of the competitive structure of an industry and a network of contacts within that industry.
    2. The skills to run the daily operations of a small, rapidly growing company.
    3. The ability to raise money.

 

Lesson 7: “The Five Master Keys” from George Leonard.

  1. Instruction (Arrange for first-rate instruction.)
  2. Practice (The path upon which you travel. Masters of anything are masters of practice.)
  3. Surrender (Satisfaction lies in mindful repetition. Surrender pride and become a learner.)
  4. Intentionality (Be a master of vision. Visualize your ideas and transform them into actuality.)
  5. The Edge (Push yourself to the limit. Walk the line between goalless practice and alluring goals found on the path.)

 

Lesson 8: You must act.

“It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood; who strives valiantly; who errs, who comes short again and again, because there is no effort without error and shortcoming; but who does actually strive to do the deeds; who knows great enthusiasms, the great devotions; who spends himself in a worthy cause; who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement, and who at the worst, if he fails, at least fails while daring greatly, so that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who neither know victory nor defeat.” -Theodore Roosevelt

 

Lesson 9: Good to Great by Jim Collins.

  1. Disciplined People
    1. Level 5 Leadership
  1. More likely to give credit for success to good luck than “personal greatness.”
    1. First “Who”, Then “What”
  1. Get the right people in place and they can figure out what objectives are top.
  1. Disciplined Thought
    1. Confront the True Facts
  1. Do not blur the lines. Deal with honest, facts, and candor.
    1. Hedgehog Concept
  1. Do what you do best. Pursue projects with the following traits:
    1. What they can be “best in the world” at.
    2. What drives profitability for their business model.
    3. What their people are deeply passionate about.
  1. Disciplined Action
    1. Culture of Discipline
  1. Discipline and entrepreneurial ethic.
    1. Technology Accelerator
  1. Link technology with hedgehog projects.

 

Lesson 10: Measure twice, cut once.

“The temptation in launching a business is to ‘get started now,’ no matter what the costs. That means accepting some team members, customers, or suppliers who don’t have the requisite passion, skill, or integrity. Just to fill a need. This is always—and I mean always—a mistake.

So surround yourself with people who strive to make ethical choices, who don’t cut corners, who are unflinchingly honest with themselves and with you.” -Jeff Sandefer

 

Lesson 11: Rules for prospering by Stephen W. Gibson.

  1. Seek the Lord and have home in him.
  2. Keep the commandments, that includes the temporal ones, tithing and fast offerings.
  3. Think about money and plan on how you can become self-reliant.
  4. Take advantage of changes of learning so you will not be ignorant of these matters. Education is the key to opportunity.
  5. Learn the laws upon which the blessings of wealth are predicated.
  6. Do not send away the naked, the hungry, the thirsty or the sick or those who are held captive.

 

Lesson 12: We can change by line upon line. Jeff Sandefer

“Decide to be a person who acts, rather than a person who says “I can’t.” Through small steps and large steps, line upon line, we can change who we are and become someone we want to be. By taking the leap to action we move to the arena and no longer one of “those cold and timid souls who neither know victory nor defeat” (Hero’s Journey p. 5).

 

Lesson 13: Identify the right opportunities for you.

Entrepreneurs must evaluate each opportunity in the context of their current situations and life plans.

  1. A personal definition of success should be multi-dimensional; “striking it rich” does not necessarily provide one with the meaning of life.
  2. As entrepreneurs, we are fortunate to have choices. We must be aware of what the world around us offers and what it demands in exchange for its largesse.
  3. Long-term success is not the result of a series of short-term, neatly planned decisions. Decisions are contingent on each preceding decision and on many factors beyond our control.
  4. Each of us lives in a web of relationships. Our choices will shape our lives and the lives of people around us . . . and vice versa.

 

These are all invaluable lessons I have learned in this class. During this class, I formed a LLC and started working for myself. I’ve invoiced my customer and received my first payment today! I’m am more excited about life than I have been in a long time. My future seems to have a lot more meaning and direction now that I have a better idea of my calling and the star I’m reaching for.

B 183 ENTREPRENEURIAL JOURNAL ENTRY 13

It’s the final week of B183 Introduction to Entrepreneurship. This was the first time I’ve taken a Summer Semester class and I loved it. I loved how much reading I had to do in such a short amount of time. In Lesson 13 I read several valuable publications including the talk by President Monson titled An Attitude of Gratitude. It is a powerful talk that helped me better understand that by having an attitude of gratitude it helps one be more optimistic. When we realize the blessings we have been given and meditate on the people in our lives that have been a blessing (mothers, fathers, teachers, friends, etc.), we move away from “selfishness, greed, indulgence, and cruelty.” These negatives lead us to “criticize, complain, blame, and to abandon the positives” of life.

Another important reading this lesson was from Harvard Business School titled, Identifying and Exploiting the Right Entrepreneurial Opportunity… for You. It provided a framework that can be used to identify if a business idea you have is a great opportunity for you. It concluded with a quote by Henry Thoreau:

I learned this . . . that if one advances confidently in the direction of his dreams and endeavors to live the life which he has imagined, he will meet a success unexpected in the common hours. . . . If you have built castles in the air, your work need not be lost; that is where they should be. Now put the foundation under them.

The world is full of opportunities. My challenge is to identify the right ones for me and seize them.

 

Here are readings and videos for this lesson:

An Attitude of Gratitude – Thomas S

Identifying and Exploiting the Right

Recognizing and Shaping Opportunities

Randy Haykin – The Making of an Entrepreneur

Paths to an Entrepreneurial Career – Ted Zoller

Avoid the Wrong Job – Stan Christensen

Acton Hero – Larry North

B 183 ENTREPRENEURIAL JOURNAL ENTRY 12

This lesson I finished the book A Field Guide for the Hero’s Journey, by Jeff Sandefer and the Rev. Robert Sirico. The book is an enlightening read on taking the leap from living mundane and meaningless routines to following the journey of fulfillment, a hero’s journey. The authors inform that a hero must “decide to be a person who acts, rather than a person who says “I can’t” (Hero’s Journey p. 1). Through small steps and large steps, line upon line, we are change who we are and become someone we want to be. By taking the leap to action we move to the arena and no longer one of “those cold and timid souls who neither know victory nor defeat” (Hero’s Journey p. 5).

I also read a paper on microlending. It is about Muhammad Yunus and is titled Microlending: Towards a Poverty-Free World. Yunus started providing microloans to impoverished people in Bangladesh that lived around the campus he taught at. He gave forty-two people a total of $27. He found it to have a large impact on those people. He continued in his experiment and after repeated refusal by banks to provide microloans to impoverished citizens he started his own bank. The bank has made more than 2.3 million loans in excess of 2.4 billion dollars with a repayment rate of 97%. He believes that every human has a right to receive credit no matter their economic situation.

Another reading is titled What’s a Business For? by Charles Handy. It compares many business models in Europe to those in the United States. It is believed that more than 60% of executive pay is tied to stock options. This pushes executives to looking for things to immediately increase profits and exchange of future growth. Many view this incentive as a way to allow executives to steal from the shareholders.

  • Based on what you read in the first two pages (pages 3 and 4), why are virtue and integrity so vital to an economy?
    • Once the public has lost trust in a company it is very hard for it to be regained. As this happens to more and more companies, people start to lose faith in the entire economy. They no longer believe the businesses care about their customers, but only about money. A poll found that 90% of people believed that leadership at corporations could not be trusted with the care of their employees. Handy also points out that CEO’s in the USA make more than 400 times the earnings of the lowest-paid staff at their company’s. The lack of integrity is obvious to the public. Corporations only care about themselves and should not be trusted.
  • According to Charles Handy, what is the “real justification” for the existence of businesses?
    • To make a profit so the business can something more or better.
  • What are two solutions proposed by Handy that you agree with? Why?
    • Dividends be paid to those who contribute their skills as well as to those who have contributed their money.
      • I worked for a web hosting company that provided profit dividends to all employees in the company. It was a new concept to me, but it encouraged everyone to help the company grow. As the company grew so did the earnings and so did the dividends. Everyone felt like their contribution mattered.
    • Measure success in terms of outcomes for others as well as for ourselves.
      • A businesses success should be tied to their customers success. If what we are doing for a customer is not helping them be a better company than we are not providing the proper level of service.

 

Here are the links to this lessons readings and videos:

Are We Not All Beggars – Holland

What’s a Business For

Microlending- Toward a Poverty-Free World

Acton Here – Sarah Endline

A New Breed of Entrepreneur – Larry Brilliant

Make It Personal and Make It Work – Sheryl Sandberg

Entrepreneurship and Consecration – Elder Gay

B 183 ENTREPRENEURIAL JOURNAL ENTRY 11

This class has flown by. That’s partially because it’s a summer semester class and the full course work is done in only 7 weeks, but’s it’s in large part due to the amount of engagement I have had with this class. The books, other reading assignments, and videos are all very helpful. During this class, I have started on my own Hero’s Journey. I’ve started my own business, signed my first contract, and just sent my first invoice. I wish I could take this class a few more times. In some ways, it feels like an institute class. I feel like a better person for having taken the class. At one time, I took the same institute class from the same instructor three times and gained new insights and understandings each time. One of the assigned readings this week was from Stephen W. Gibson. He is an author, educator, and entrepreneur that has started or funded over a dozen businesses, including ancestry.com and 1800Contacts. He gave a talk at BYU-Idaho titled, Attitude on Money, where he teaches many important things regarding money.

“The first thing we need to understand about money is that is not evil. Money is neither good nor

bad. The Love of money or the obsession with accumulating money from others unrighteously,

no matter what the method, may be evil, but money in and of itself is neither good nor evil.

Realize this million-dollar bill can give the possessor of this bill the power to buy a million hamburgers for hungry children or buy a million bullets to kill the innocent. It can buy a million pills to treat the sick or a million cigarettes to make people sick. It isn’t the million dollars that is bad or evil but how it is used.”

 

  • What is your attitude toward money?
    • Buy low/sell high. Money is not evil, it is only money. How we feel about it and what we do with it determines if it is used for good or bad.
  • How can your view of money affect the way you live?
    • Having a view that money is a way to bless your family and to serve others can be a positive viewpoint. However, having a view that money is the only way to happiness can lead to self-destructive behavior.
  • What rules are recommended for prospering?
    • 1. Seek the Lord and have home in him.
    • 2. Keep the commandments, that includes the temporal ones, tithing and fast offerings.
    • 3. Think about money and plan on how you can become self-reliant.
    • 4. Take advantage of changes of learning so you will not be ignorant of these matters. Education is the key to opportunity.
    • 5. Learn the laws upon which the blessings of wealth are predicated.
    • 6. Do not send away the naked, the hungry, the thirsty or the sick or those who are held captive.

 

Here are the links to the readings and videos for the lesson:

Formula for Success – Monson

life-_liberty_and_the_pursuit_of_happiness

Attitude on Money

Is Work/Life Balance Possible – Ann Miura-Ko

Balancing Your Life and Your Career Successfully – Randy Komisar

Hero’s Journey Corey Bell

Surviving the Entrepreneurial Life: Work and Family

TMOB LL Financial Fitness

B 183 ENTREPRENEURIAL JOURNAL ENTRY 10

Lesson 10 has been a very intense lesson. I just submitted my Entrepreneurial Interview Paper and am feeling very excited about my own business. My interview with Jim Morgan from American Data Management provided me several valuable lessons.

One lesson is to measure twice, cut one. A single piece of bad advice that isn’t double-checked can turn into a disastrous piece of advice. Don’t put all your eggs into one basket. Putting too much dependence on one customer can quickly make things disastrous. Another lesson is to know who the decision makers are at any company you are trying to do business with.

Jim also gave several keys to being a successful entrepreneur.

  1. Understand the business functions of the client. They will underestimate their time and service requirements.
  2. You must be self-motivated.
  3. Wake-up early. Most work can be done by 1:00pm.
  4. Must not be prone to depression.
  5. Understand the volume of activity required in recruiting new customers. Include a lot of failures/noes into that plan.
  6. The customer is always right!
  7. Networking is very important!

This week was also spent reading the talk, The Challenge to Become, by Elder Oaks. It is a powerful discourse on progressing from testimony to becoming what Heavenly Father would has us be. I also read Chapter 4 of A Field Guide for the Hero’s Journey.  In it, Jeff Sandefer discusses the importance of avoiding negative people and dishonest people.

“The temptation in launching a business is to ‘get started now,’ no matter what the costs. That means accepting some team members, customers, or suppliers who don’t have the requisite passion, skill, or integrity. Just to fill a need. This is always—and I mean always—a mistake.

So surround yourself with people who strive to make ethical choices, who don’t cut corners, who are unflinchingly honest with themselves and with you.”

 

Here are the links to the readings and videos for this lesson:

The Challenge to Become – Dallin H

The Heart of Entrepreneurship

Think Big – Taylor Richards

License to Pursue Dreams – Marissa Mayer

Acton Hero – Kathy Huber

Launching Leaders – Your Emotional Fingerprint

Naive Networking

 

B 183 ENTREPRENEURIAL JOURNAL ENTRY 9

This lesson was focused on leadership. I read Elder Bednar’s address on BYU-I Disciple Preparation Center as well as President Kim B. Clark’s address Leadership with a Small “L.” I also read a publishing by Acton MBA on being someone that gets the job done and a summary of Jim Collins’ book, Good to Great.

After describing what a DPC is, Elder Bednar gave three DPC lessons. Lesson 1, “A disciple’s faith is focused upon the Son of God.” Lesson 2, “A disciple recognizes that faith in the Savior is a spiritual gift and appropriately seeks for that gift in his or her life.” Lesson 3, “A disciple’s faith in the Savior and spiritual preparation dispel fear.”

In Leadership with a Small “L”, President Clark teaches three leadership principles that were taught by the Savior. Principle 1, “Lead by example… your life can be a living model of what you want your children to be.” Principle 2, “Lead with vision… One of the most important things that leaders do is to help the people they lead understand the larger meaning and purpose of their daily work.” Principle 3, “Lead with love…  Effective small “L” leaders learn to energize the people around them through love in action.”

In Jim Collins’ book, Good to Great, taking your business from good to great is done around three standards of excellence.

  1. Disciplined People
    1. Level 5 Leadership
      1. More likely to give credit for success to good luck than “personal greatness.”
    2. First “Who”, Then “What”
      1. Get the right people in place and they can figure out what objectives are top.
    3. Disciplined Thought
      1. Confront the True Facts
        1. Do not blur the lines. Deal with honest, facts, and candor.
      2. Hedgehog Concept
        1. Do what you do best. Pursue projects with the following traits:
          1. What they can be “best in the world” at.
          2. What drives profitability for their business model.
          3. What their people are deeply passionate about.
        2. Disciplined Action
          1. Culture of Discipline
            1. Discipline and entrepreneurial ethic.
          2. Technology Accelerator
            1. Link technology with hedgehog projects.

 

Here are links to the readings and videos for this lesson:

Brigham Young University–Idaho: A Disciple Preparation Center (DPC) – Bednar

Leadership with a Small “L” – Clark

A Message to Garcia – Acton MBA

Good to Great

Aspects of Building Trust – Guy Kawasaki

Hiring Ethical People – Frank Levinson

Leadership and Capability – Carly Fiorina

Launching Leaders – LL Lesson 10 Achieving Higher Ground

Launching Leaders – LL Lesson 07 Good to Great

B 183 ENTREPRENEURIAL JOURNAL ENTRY 8

In Lesson 8 I started reading the book, A Field Guide for The Hero’s Journey, by Jeff Sandefer and Reverend Robert Sirico. I’ve become a fan of Jeff Sandefer from a talk I watched where he spoke on the Hero’s Journey. I also learned more about the Acton MBA school he founded, and the Acton Academy he and his wife founded. The Acton MBA school is focused on learning through projects. It uses a lot of case studies to help teach the students. The Acton Academy appears to use a similar approach. So far, I have been very impressed with the book. It has already spoken to me and has me excited to be in the arena. It included a powerful quote from Theodore Roosevelt:

“It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood; who strives valiantly; who errs, who comes short again and again, because there is no effort without error and shortcoming; but who does actually strive to do the deeds; who knows great enthusiasms, the great devotions; who spends himself in a worthy cause; who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement, and who at the worst, if he fails, at least fails while daring greatly, so that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who neither know victory nor defeat.”

This lesson also has the class preparing for the entrepreneur interview and subsequent paper. I’ve found the entrepreneur I want to interview, Jim Morgan with American Data Management. I have a meeting setup with him for this coming Monday. I’m finishing the interview questions I plan on asking him.

Here are the readings and videos for this lesson:

However Long and Hard the Road – Holland

Looking Back and Moving Forward – Monson

Acton Hero: David Carrington

You Can Do Anything – Taylor Richards

The Five Why’s – Eric Ries

Good Things to come – Holland

B 183 ENTREPRENEURIAL JOURNAL ENTRY 7

Lesson 7 had a lot of reading. I’ve read more in the past few weeks than I have in the past six months! I finished the book Mastery, by George Leonard.  Leonard teaches “The Five Master Keys”

  1. Instruction (Arrange for first-rate instruction.)
  2. Practice (The path upon which you travel. Masters of anything are masters of practice.)
  3. Surrender (Satisfaction lies in mindful repetition. Surrender pride and become a learner.)
  4. Intentionality (Be a master of vision. Visualize your ideas and transform them into actuality.)
  5. The Edge (Push yourself to the limit. Walk the line between goalless practice and alluring goals found on the path.)

Leonard also points out the importance of health in being a master of anything. Similarly, in Stephen R. Covey’s book, The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People, he points out the importance of physical exercise. He recommends 30 minutes of physical exercise every day as part of Habit 7, Sharpen the Saw. This is part of spending 1 hour each day to keep yourself from using a blunt saw. The other 30 minutes should be spent on spiritual, mental, and social / emotional sharpening. For myself, spiritual sharpening includes prayer and scripture study. Mental sharpening includes taking BYU-I classes and IT technical training. Social / emotional sharpening includes thoughtful focus on my interactions with others.

In the summaries.com summary of the book, it states:

“A Daily Private Victory, in which you spend one hour a day in the renewal of the physical, spiritual and mental dimensions, is the key to the development of the 7 Habits. It is also the foundation for the Daily Public Victory.”

I believe focusing on Habit 7 will be the most meaningful and valuable habit for me to work on.

Here are links to the readings and videos for this week:

Mastery chapters 10-14

Stand True and Faithful – Hinckley

The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People

Passion vs Money – Guy Kawasaki

7 Habits – ll

 

B 183 ENTREPRENEURIAL JOURNAL ENTRY 6

This lesson was shorter than usual. More reading than usual, but not as many other activities. The reading was very useful though. I read five chapters from the book Mastery. I’m looking forward to finishing the book and starting A Hero’s Journey. My wife and I have been brainstorming entrepreneurial ideas. She wants to start her own school. The focus would be learning through projects. Whole doing research online she found a school franchise she found very interesting. She agrees with the standards, philosophies, and methods. She said the name is Acton Academy and it is run by a husband and wife named the Sandefer’s! I told her about the Acton MBA school and that I was a little familiar with Jeff Sandefer. I plan on showing her the talk Jeff Sandefer gave at BYU regarding a Hero’s Journey.

This week I also formed my first LLC!

ZIP IT SERVICES, LLC was officially formed on 8/11/17.

I have my first client lined up and plan on signing a contract this coming week. I’ve always had an entrepreneurial spirit, but it has always been “someday.” This class helped me to decide the best time is now! To not put off promptings and inspiration of the heart.

Here are links to this week’s readings and videos:

Mastery chapters 5-9

Succes is Gauged by Self-Mastery

So You Want To Be An Entrepreneur

How Entrepreneurs Craft Strategies That Work

The Entrepreneur and the Family

Three Lessons About What It Means To Be an Entrepreneur

Loyalty to God and Family